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Our county's blessing boxes are serving the needs of hungry county residents, and can use your help. Many of them have run completely out of food. If you're in a position to help keep them stocked, it truly would be a blessing to those you help.

You can stop by any of the boxes and drop off shelf stable food items at any time. All of the boxes that we know of are on these two lists.
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Some important information from our national partners at the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Regardless of your child’s age, he or she may feel upset or have other strong emotions after an emergency. Some children react right away, while others may show signs of difficulty much later. How a child reacts and the common signs of distress can vary according to the child’s age, previous experiences, and how the child typically copes with stress.

Children react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with a disaster calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

People can become more distressed if they see repeated images of a disaster in the media. Early on, consider limiting the amount of exposure you and your loved ones get to media coverage.

The amount of damage caused from a disaster can be overwhelming. The destruction of homes and separation from school, family, and friends can create a great amount of stress and anxiety for children.

The emotional impact of an emergency on a child depends on a child’s characteristics and experiences, the social and economic circumstances of the family and community, and the availability of local resources. Not all children respond in the same ways. Some might have more severe, longer-lasting reactions. The following specific factors may affect a child’s emotional response:

· Direct involvement with the emergency

· Previous traumatic or stressful event

· Belief that the child or a loved one may die

· Loss of a family member, close friend, or pet

· Separation from caregivers

· Physical injury

· How parents and caregivers respond

· Family resources

· Relationships and communication among family members

· Repeated exposure to mass media coverage of the emergency and aftermath

· Ongoing stress due to the change in familiar routines and living conditions

· Cultural differences

· Community resilience

More information what you can do to help children who have been affected by a disaster can be found on the CDC's website at www.cdc.gov/childrenindisasters/helping-children-cope.html.
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It's that time of year!
Prepare. Plan. Stay Informed.
Community Health Is Our Mission

Welcome to the Webster County Health Unit!

Public health touches every person every day. From clean air and water to safe food to immunizations that protect us from disease, our staff provide excellent, customer focused, confidential programs and services at little to no cost.

We make it our mission to preserve and protect public health in our community.

We are a local public health agency, a Missouri political subdivision, and tax exempt as a government organization. Our annual operating budget is approximately $900,000 with income from personal property tax, state and federal grants and fees for service. Services are provided to all Webster County residents without discrimination and no one is denied services due to an inability to pay.

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Upcoming Events

Nothing from May 29, 2020 to June 5, 2020.